The Benefits of
Treating Hearing Loss



The Benefits of
Treating Hearing Loss

Treating hearing loss has a lot of unexpected benefits, and along with helping you hear clearly, treating hearing loss will improve your physical, mental, and emotional health. Many Americans avoid treating hearing loss, and may wait between five to seven years before seeking treatment!

If you wait years to treat your hearing loss, you’re putting your health and well-being at risk. You may experience cognitive decline, social isolation, depression, and a greater chance of falls and injury. Hearing loss can also affect your career, and you’ll risk mishearing instructions, getting confused during meetings, or being overlooked for a promotion.

Treating hearing loss is an easy and effective way to protect yourself, safeguarding your cognitive function and mental health, and allowing you to enjoy a vibrant social life without straining to hear. Scheduling a hearing test and treating hearing loss can also improve your overall health and wellbeing by shining a light on other health concerns.


Social Benefits of Treating Hearing Loss

Treating hearing loss has a big impact on your social well-being. Those with hearing loss struggle to communicate with friends and loved ones, are more easily irritated, and suffer from moodiness, anxiety, or even depression. If you’re not able to follow conversations with ease, especially in places with a lot of background noise, you’re more likely to withdraw from social settings, avoid going out to meet with friends, and suffer from feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Treating hearing loss can help you maintain a healthy social life, and you’ll enjoy meeting friends for dinner, easily keeping up with all the conversations bouncing back and forth across the table.


Social Benefits of Treating Hearing Loss

Treating hearing loss has a big impact on your social well-being. Those with hearing loss struggle to communicate with friends and loved ones, are more easily irritated, and suffer from moodiness, anxiety, or even depression. If you’re not able to follow conversations with ease, especially in places with a lot of background noise, you’re more likely to withdraw from social settings, avoid going out to meet with friends, and suffer from feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Treating hearing loss can help you maintain a healthy social life, and you’ll enjoy meeting friends for dinner, easily keeping up with all the conversations bouncing back and forth across the table.

Cognitive Benefits of Treating Hearing Loss

Those with untreated hearing loss greatly increase their chances of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. When you struggle to hear and withdraw from social situations, your brain isn’t getting the exercise it needs to stay healthy. In a tragic case of use it or lose it, this inactivity can lead to a loss of brain cells, and you’ll increase your chances of rapid cognitive decline. You’ll also be at a far higher risk of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Treating hearing loss keeps your brain active and healthy, and you’ll enjoy great cognitive health for years to come.

Other Health Concerns

Cardiovascular Health: Hearing loss can be a warning sign of heart problems, and a hearing test could help you uncover a heart issue. The cells in your ear rely on good blood circulation to bring the oxygen needed for proper function. Without amble oxygen, the cells in your ear will be damaged, or even die. Maintaining your hearing health will help you notice the small changes in your hearing health, and easily monitor your heart health to detect early warning signs of heart disease.

Otosclerosis: Otosclerosis is a growth of bone in the middle ear that can cause conductive hearing loss. With otosclerosis, the small bones in your middle ear get stuck in place, and aren’t able to transmit soundwaves from the outside world into your inner ear for processing. A hearing test can determine the cause of your hearing loss, and you’ll be able to seek early treatment for otosclerosis.

Meniere’s Disease: The symptoms of Meniere’s Disease include balance problems, dizziness, and nausea. Meniere’s Disease is caused by an imbalance of the fluids in the inner ear, and treating hearing loss can help correct this problem and control the symptoms of Meniere’s Disease.

Paget’s Disease: Another health concern related to hearing loss is Paget’s Disease. This bone disorder is characterized by a large skull that can put pressure on the head, and lead to pain in the nerves, joints, and bones of your ears, neck, and head. Monitoring your hearing health, and detecting Paget’s disease, early will help you manage this disease.

Rheumatoid arthritis: Rheumatoid arthritis affects your joints, causing swelling and pain. Arthritis can also affect your hearing, so looking after your hearing health early will prevent long-term damage to your ears from arthritis.